CCC – Cutting essential services to the Red Zone after 30 April 2013

In response to an OIA request:

Has the Christchurch City Council, either elected members or staff, received formal or informal enquiries from CERA about what services can be cut off in the Residential Red Zones after 30 April 2012?
If yes, please advise what requests have been made and how copies of them can be obtained.

the CCC have provided the following response:

Further to your request I have received the following comment from staff. We have not received any requests from CERA to date on what services can be cut off after 30 April 2013. CCC and CERA have worked on a programme of cutting off wastewater and water supply to houses that have been purchased by the Government and are vacated in order to reduce operational costs and risks in the residential red zones. CCC has also been collecting wheelie bins from properties that have been purchased by the government and the residents have left. The wheelie bins are owned by the City’s contractor and are attached to the property title and not the owner or occupant.

What does it mean? At this stage it looks as though the property has to have been purchased by the Government and vacated before the Council will cut off wastewater and water supplies. Be interesting to know if Minister Brownlee and CERA see it this way. It would also be interesting to know if Council staff will be prepared to cut services off where someone is still living in a Red Zone house after 30 April 2013.  Would they cross a picket line? NOTE: the OIA information was obtained via the website fyi.org.nz. You can see the request and answers here. .

Human Rights Commission – Canterbury Earthquakes: review and appeal rights

The Human Rights Commission have launched three web pages for those affected by earthquakes.

The first, Canterbury Earthquakes: review and appeal rights, is here. The introduction to the web page states:

This information collects in one place the review or appeal rights for common situations people face arising out of the earthquakes in Canterbury. It does not claim to be a comprehensive review of all the appeal and or appeal rights. If you would like legal advice you should consult a lawyer.

This information comes from the websites of the Christchurch City Council, CERA, Fletcher Earthquake Recovery, the Office of the Ombudsmen and from research by the Human Rights Commission.

Some review and or appeal rights relate to a particular issue and others apply in most, if not all, situations.

The issues covered by the page are:
  • The review of red stickered notices
  • Obtaining reasons for decisions made by a council about you
  • Zoning decisions
  • Declining the government’s offer
  • Obtaining reasons for decisions made by CERA about you
  • Repairs
  • General Zoning Issues
  • Other rights of review/appeal
  • Accommodation, property, landlords and human rights

The second is the web page (hereWhat complaints processes are available if I am unhappy with the Fletcher Earthquake Recovery or building contractor repairs/service provision? This is a distillation of appeal information from the Fletcher/EQR website.

Surprisingly there is not a page dedicated to EQC – what there is will be found buried in the third page on repairs (here).

These pages are a useful bringing together of information for those in the Green Zones who are new to the problems of zoning and insurance. As they are based upon information from official sources there are no new insights, or silver bullets, for those in the Red Zones.
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Help coming soon from the Human Rights Commission?

The following web pages are on the HRC site, but password protected for now. Apparently they are still under development and will soon be accessible to the public. Canterbury Earthquakes: review and appeal rights  http://www.hrc.co.nz/human-rights-environment/canterbury-earthquakes What complaints processes are available if I am unhappy with the Fletcher Earthquake Recovery or building contractor repairs/service provision?  http://www.hrc.co.nz/human-rights-environment/canterbury-earthquakes/complaints-processes

NZ Human Rights Commission on the Christchurch Earthquakes

The NZ Human Rights Commission (HRC) produced a submission in March this year as part of it’s implementation of the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (ICESCR) From the HRC web site:

This submission focuses on the Christchurch recovery, and three key enduring challenges for New Zealand identified in New Zealand’s Universal Periodic Review (UPR), other treaty body recommendations, and highlighted in the Commission’s 2010 review of human rights in New Zealand:

  • violence
  • inequality
  • the full and effective incorporation of international human rights obligations.

A copy of the report can be downloaded from here.